There’s nothing like sweet corn on the cob. As we get into prime corn season, we’re reminded that corn can be used in a variety of ways.

Although boiling is the easiest, grilling always adds a smoky depth of flavor. Pro tip: Before you grill, soak the still-husked corn in salted water for 10 minutes, then grill the corn while it’s still in the husk. It brings out the flavor of the corn!

Here are three ways to turn corn into something even more delicious:

Have you had Mexican street corn? If not, you’re missing out!  Want to make it picnic-friendly? Soak kabob skewers in water for a few minutes, then put the corn on the skewer. Try this recipe below:

 

Mexican Street Corn

  • 6 to 8 medium ears of sweet corn, husks removed
  • ½ cup of Mexican crema, or substitute with sour cream
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • ½ cup cilantro
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • ¼ teaspoon chipotle pepper
  • 2 teaspoons lime zest
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice from one line
  • ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled
  1. Grill sweet corn.
  2. While the corn is grilling, in a medium bowl mix crema, mayonnaise, cilantro, garlic, chipotle pepper, lime zest and juice and cotija cheese. Set aside.
  3. Once the corn is finished, place on a plate. Brush the mixture on top of the corn. Serve immediately.

Another corny idea…

Ina Garten, aka “The Barefoot Contessa,” has a great way to use corn in a Jalapeno Cheddar Cornbread recipe. But we tweaked it by adding in fresh corn. Although fresh is always best, you can actually grill some corn now and use it at a later date. Cut it off the cob and put it in a freezer bag. Be sure to allow the corn to cool before moving it to the freezer.

 

Jalapeno Cheddar Extra Corn Cornbread

  • 3 medium ears of corn, prepared and removed from the cob
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • ¼ cup of sugar
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 cups of milk
  • 3 extra-large eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, melted, plus extra to grease the pan
  • 8 ounces aged extra-sharp Cheddar, grated and divided
  • ⅓ cup chopped scallions, white and green parts, plus extra for garnish, 3 scallions
  • 3 tablespoons seeded and minced fresh jalapeno peppers
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-by-13-by-2-inch baking pan.
  2. Prepare corn as you like. Remove from corncob. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  4. In a separate bowl, combine milk, eggs, and butter.
  5. With a wooden spoon, stir the wet ingredients into the dry until most of the lumps are dissolved. Don’t overmix.
  6. Mix in 2 cups of the grated cheddar, scallions, jalapeno, and corn. Allow the mixture to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes.
  7. Pour batter into prepared pan. Smooth the top, and sprinkle with the remaining grated Cheddar and extra chopped scallions.
  8. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool and cut into large squares. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

And here is our last corny idea if you want something quick to make for a side…

This is a great go-to recipe that’s light and refreshing. Pro tip: Although it’s tempting to not add salt, it’s needed to help elevate the flavors of the ingredients.

 

Corn Tomatoes and Avocado Salad

  • 3 medium-sized ears of corn, cooked and cut from the cub
  • 1 pint halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1 avocado, diced into ¼ inches
  • ½ cup finely diced red onion
  • 1 medium green pepper, diced
  • 1 medium jalapeno, diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • ½ teaspoon grated lime zest
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  1. In a large bowl, add all the ingredients. Mix together and serve. This dip pairs extra well with corn chips.

Just think–there are thousands of other ways to use corn! Visit our market to see all types of corn we have, including non-GMO Mirai bi-color corn. We’re open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

In a matter of weeks, the kids will be back in school. That means you need to start thinking of ways to give them a healthy afterschool snack to keep them occupied while you get dinner ready.

Sure there are the easy snacks like apple slices with peanut butter or grapes and cheese, but how about something with slightly more substance? This recipe packs enough protein and fiber to keep the kids going until dinner is ready. And, this recipe can not only be made ahead of time, but the kids can help you prepare it.

The beauty of zucchini is that it can be frozen. Shred the zucchini, squeeze out the extra water, divide it by pounds and add it to a zipped freezer bag. When you need to make your snacks for the week, you can just grab a bag and get going.

Or you can make muffins ahead of time and freeze them. Before serving, pop one in the microwave for a few minutes (time fluctuates with microwaves brands).

For this recipe, we found one that sounded simply delicious at SimplyRecipes.com.

 

Dried Cranberry and Walnut Muffins

  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 ⅓ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups, grated zucchini, paced
  • 2 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 cup walnuts (optional)
  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. In a large bowl, beat eggs. Add sugar and vanilla. Stir in zucchini and butter.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and salt.
  4. Slowly combine dry ingredients to wet. Do not overmix. When the mixture is fully combined, stir in walnuts and cranberries.
  5. Coat muffin paper with nonstick spray or butter. Using a medium-sized scoop, add the mixture to the pan, making sure to distribute evenly.
  6. Bake on the middle rack for about 25 minutes. Test with a toothpick to make sure the center is done. Let the pan cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes. Remove muffins to cool for an additional 20 minutes.

Come on down and get some zucchini. It’s yours for the picking. We’re open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Who can forget when, in “Dirty Dancing,” Baby says “I carried a watermelon” to Johnny at the dance? Boy, was she embarrassed.

We can’t promise you that you’ll meet the person of your dreams or learn how to dance the cha-cha when you visit us for watermelon, but we promise you won’t be embarrassed to show off these watermelon dishes at your summer soiree.

Of course, the easiest thing to do with a watermelon is to chill it in the fridge and then slice it up. But why be boring? Here are some ways to jazz up the fruit.

 

Grilled Watermelon

Looking for a simple way to use up the last of the watermelon? This recipe is perfect when you just need one last little bit of smoky sweetness.

  •  9 slices of watermelon, preferably seedless
  • Kabob skewers, soaked and prepared
  • Olive oil for brushing
  • Salt and pepper
  • Chopped mint (optional)
  1. Prepare grill at high heat. Push a skewer through slice at an angle.
  2. Lightly brush watermelon slices with olive oil on both sides.
  3. Place on grill, and flip when you see grill marks.
  4. After marks are on both sides or about five minutes total, set aside on a plate and lightly sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  5. Add mint. Serve.

 

Watermelon Granita

Granita is really just a super simple version of Italian ice. The upside to this dessert is that the longer you wait, the more juicy and sweet it becomes. The downside is that it’s going to take three hours until it can be served. We found this recipe at momadvice.com blog.

  • 1 large watermelon, preferably seedless, cubed
  • ½ cup sugar
  • Juice of 2 limes
  1. In a blender combine watermelon, sugar and lime juice.
  2. Add to a metal pan and freeze for about an hour.
  3. With a fork, scrape the watermelon to loosen it, and return to freezer.
  4. Wait for another hour. After this process has been repeated for three hours, remove from pan and serve in cups or a hollowed out watermelon.

 

Grilled Chicken-Watermelon Tacos

Tacos aren’t just for Tuesdays, and this dish will add a little sweetness to the same-old chicken taco.

  • 4 pounds sliced grilled chicken
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 cups chopped seedless watermelon
  • 1 jalapeno, minced
  • ½ small red onion, minced
  • ¼ cup lime juice
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Tortilla shells, heated
  • ½ cup crumbled Cotija cheese
  1. Salt and pepper chicken. Over medium heat, grill chicken. When chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165 F, remove from heat and set aside. Let rest for a few minutes. Slice into strips.
  2. In a large bowl, add watermelon, jalapeno, onion, lime juice, cilantro and salt.
  3. On a warm tortilla shell, add chicken and watermelon mixture. Top with cheese. Serve.
  4. Makes 4 servings.

Come on down to get your watermelon. All we ask is that you don’t put Baby in the corner. We’re open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The week of August 4-10 is National Farmers Market Week, so let’s celebrate all that we do here at Orr’s Farm Market!

By definition, a farmers market is a location where farmers can sell their wares to customers. The beauty about our farm market is that customers don’t only get to put a face with the product we sell, but they also have the advantage of coming onto the farm itself to see where we produce the food they buy.

We are not alone in our endeavor to bring fresh, quality food to the masses. According to the United States Department of Agriculture Farmers Market Directory, there are at least 8,000 farmers markets across the U.S. Here in the Eastern Panhandle there are nearly 10!

What we love about having our own farm market is that while people shop in the farm market, they can look out into the fields where some of the crops grow. Other than for the pretty cool view, we put together five reasons why you should shop at a farmers market.

  1. It’s fresh.  Actually, the only way you’ll get fresher food is if you pick it yourself (which you can do here at Orr’s!). Our food isn’t put into a truck that drives hundreds of miles to be sold at a grocery store, but is grown right here.
  2. Face to face. When you purchase food from a farmers market, you’re most likely going to be interacting with the farmer or the farmer’s family. They are the ones who nurtured the food from a sprout to that zucchini you’re holding. So when you ask a question about how it’s grown or what is used to grow it, you’re asking the people who actually know.
  3. Support local. Putting money into the pockets of local farmers means no middleman. According to the Farmers Market Coalition, for every dollar of food spent in 2017 in America, the American farmer only received 17.4 cents. But when food is purchased directly from the farmer, he or she can make up to 90 cents on the dollar. In turn, that helps to boost the local economy and continues the legacy of generational farmers.
  4. Great place to meet up. It’s a good place to run into friends, family and neighbors. That’s because a farmers market is more than a destination–it’s the community hub of like-minded individuals.
  5. Learn something new. Farmers markets give you the ability to learn to prepare food that you serve all the time in a new and exciting way. At a farmers market, you can pick something up, give it a sniff, and ask anyone near you: “Any ideas on how I should prepare this?” You’re bound to get some good advice.

Come see how many of these five things you can experience at our market. We’re open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.